Posts

Audio Analysis of the Beatles

I discovered this post at Waxy last week. A fascinating review of how the Beatles approached the process of multi-track recording. I’ve included the links here so that you can jump directly to the mp3s hosted on Waxy’s site.

Multitrack Analysis of She’s Leaving Home
Multitrack Analysis of A Day In the Life
Multitrack Analysis of Come Together

Abbey Road For Sale

Another sign of the times for the recording industry. EMI, which is fighting to survive as a business, needs to find some cash. EMI posted an annual loss of $2.35 billion dollars. Liabilities exceed assets. And it looks like the debt holders are getting ready to shut EMI down.

EMI bought the house at number 3 Abbey Road in the early 1900s. The property became a recording studio. It was made famous when the Beatles recorded most of their work at Abbey Road between 1962 and 1969. Lots of great recordings were made at this iconic studio.

A Hard Day’s Night

There has been some interest in the opening chord of The Beatles’ A Hard Day’s Night. The chord was attributed to George Harrison and his Rickenbacker guitar, but how he played it has eluded Beatles fans and guitarists alike.

Dr Jason Brown, of Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia, came up with a way to break down the chord’s components by digitising it and using a mathematical equation.

He reached the conclusion that there must have been another instrument involved. He broke the chord down to show that Harrison played eight notes on his 12-string Rickenbacker.

Lennon is responsible for one note that probably came from a six-string guitar, while McCartney played one note on bass. George Martin, the man who produced the Beatles music, played five notes on piano.

Imagine, using effects when recording a guitar to create a bigger than life sound.