Classic Vibe Telecaster 50s

What happens when you find an inexpensive guitar, made in China, which seems to perform at a pro level? Particularly if you know you are going to be playing dates where your high-end instruments may suffer?

I was looking for a cheap electric guitar that I could use as a sub for my primary instruments for some of the dates I am playing over the next few months. And someone suggested that I try the Squier Classic Vibe Telecaster ’50s.

There is a lot of buzz about this particular guitar. And I have to admit that I was really surprised with how well the instrument played. Especially when it was priced at around four hundred dollars. The folks at Twelfth Fret describe the guitar this way:

The new Classic Vibe Series from the Fender/Squier company has really got our staff excited. It is pretty tough to beat these guitars! Take the new Classic Vibe Tele … with its great med/low elliptical neck profile and highly polished medium jumbo frets … the translucent Vintage Blonde finish showing just a hint of grain from the solid pine body … the AlNiCo 3 single coil pickups … the brass saddles … this is an instrument worthy of a pro player, at an entry-level price point!

It came home with me last night. And the guitar does play. Frankly, I am still shocked. Similar reactions can be found here.

9 replies
  1. Elvin
    Elvin says:

    Hi Richard. I’ve always wanted a tele ever since I heard Jim Messina’s work with Poco and Kenny Loggins. Many times over the years I’ve tried new ones in the store and couldn’t find one that I really liked plus there are so many different models available. I felt the same about stratocasters. I’ve always been a humbucker guy but wanted to have at least one decent single coil guitar. I recently bought a new Fender american deluxe strat which was just an impulse buy cause I tried it out at L&M and it felt and sounded just right. I still pine for tele though so i’ll check out the vibe. Not crazy about only 21 frets though.

    Reply
    • Richard Cleaver
      Richard Cleaver says:

      I’m pretty impressed with it particularly for the money.

      As you may know, the 50’s era teles featured 21 frets and, in keeping with the vintage feel, this instrument is offered with 21 frets.

      Reply
  2. Pete Townsend
    Pete Townsend says:

    I think it’s a great axe ! and because pine is lighter and softer than ash, the weight will be easier on an aging back, and can get dramatic results when doing some good old stage smashing with it.. Enjoy !

    Reply
  3. Stephen Meyer
    Stephen Meyer says:

    I almost bought the Squire vibe stratocaster. From reports I heard, it actually has better pick-up and frets than that mexican made strat.

    Reply
  4. Michael Fugazi
    Michael Fugazi says:

    I love this Tele, I’m still in awe of it’s quality build and finish and the sound is amazing – sustain just never ends on this no matter what I play it through. Plays clean like a dream allowing for very clean and clear classy Tele twangs and tones. I highly recommend this axe – I see them becoming much sought after in years to come like the original Japanese made Squire axes. The neck is a beautiful to play without any ragged edges at all from the frets; smooth is the word. Suprisingly low buzz too considering that the Tele almost always has some noise generated from the usually ‘low’ volume pick ups.

    This Squire Telecaster outshines any expectations you may have about Squire guitars in general and if your looking for a Telecaster you won’t find any better than this at the price – I even got mine half-price due to being last one in the store simply because it had been played as a demo (which only helped to break this beauty in a bit when I got to it).

    Reply
  5. Matthew Cleaver
    Matthew Cleaver says:

    What about my telecaster that I am going to make? will it be just as good since it will be homemade instead of someone from china?

    Reply

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