Big and Stubby

One of the guitarists in the studio this past week-end was using a Dunlop Big Stubby pick. A 3 mm thick pick. A really, really thick pick.

Being a curious sort of fellow, I decided to go and get a few of these picks. I was playing a live set last night and, with the reckless abandon of youth, I went cold with a different pick.

I am closing in on 50 years of age with over 30 years of playing experience. I found a new trick. A thick pick.

Think speed. The attack of these picks really increased speed. Either that, or there was something sparky in my bottled water.

Big Stubby Guitar Picks

9 replies
  1. Matt S
    Matt S says:

    I’m glad you like them =)

    I’m extremely “picky” (bad pun) when it comes to these things. I used to be a big fan of the dunlop tortex .88’s (the green ones), and then i found the dunlop jazz III’s (they come in black and red, two different materials), and then the big stubby picks.

    I’ve only started using them as of last month and now I’m hooked. I just feel that overall right-hand control is maximized with a great pick in your hand. It allows me to relax much more.

    I like the tone of these picks as well, very beefy and smooth. I think the 2mm counterpart is smooth, but weak.

    I’m pretty sure Andy finds these picks digusting =), lol. I believe his picks of choice are measured in nanometers. I wonder if he’ll have anything to say…

    Reply
  2. richard cleaver
    richard cleaver says:

    I liked them a lot.

    I’ve played medium picks for a long, long time. Last night was the first time I ever switched picks. And, I liked everything about them: control, attack, tone.

    Thank you for bringing them to my attention. My first reaction was: “How on earth can you play a guitar with picks that thick?” Then I thought I would give them a try.

    What a difference.

    Reply
  3. Rob
    Rob says:

    Richard, OK, you win – I have seen them and shunned them without any trial whatsoever. Off to L and M to pick up a few. I share the same age/playing attributes you describe of yourself, so I have nothing to lose and only finesse and speed to gain! Why not? Rob

    Reply
  4. richard cleaver
    richard cleaver says:

    Rob – hope it works out for you. Like you, I had seen these types of picks before and never even bothered with them.

    Then again, I used to play 009s all the time until I discovered better tone and control with heavier guage strings.

    I really should be more open-minded 😉

    Reply
  5. Rob
    Rob says:

    Well, I tried out the purple stubby – and think I may have achieved 32nd note speed! Or it also may have been something sparky in MY bottled water! You may have a convert here! I usually use the larger Fenders, gripping with thumb and 2 fingers on my right hand – seems all I need is two on the stubby. I like it, a lot! Thanks for the tip!

    Reply
  6. richard cleaver
    richard cleaver says:

    Matt was the guitar player who showed me this trick. He uses the jazz picks; same thickness, smaller size. I found that I could play with more confidence and attack. And, overall speed improved.

    Reply
  7. AndyB
    AndyB says:

    lol… I finally posted some stuff on the blog about my slow migration to the Stubby pics lately.. I remember one session back when we were doin some lead lines Richard. You could hear the thin pick wasn’t doin it… then u said hey lets try a different pic… i picked up my new Stubby pick…voila! Very nice tone…

    Reply
  8. richard cleaver
    richard cleaver says:

    Hi Dan. The big and stubby picks are great for electrics. For acoustic guitar I will almost always use standard picks: thins or mediums. In the studio, thin picks add a nice texture for strumming. Mediums project better tone. I would not use a 3mm pick for acoustic. However, there is no harm in trying one out. I was surprised when I tried the big and stubby picks on electric!

    Reply

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